Supporting Games On Multiple Platforms (Part 1)

A lot of people ask how I (and many other developers) manage to support so many platforms at a time. After all, Siralim and Siralim 2 are available on Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, iOS, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation Vita – and that’s understandably a lot of work for one developer to handle. I’ve decided to write a blog post about this topic, as well as a brief overview of what it’s like to launch a game on each platform. I’ll break this topic down into 3 parts – the first will discuss the Steam release (Windows, Mac, and Linux), the second will discuss the mobile release (Android and iOS), and the third and final part will discuss the console release (PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita).

What engine do you use to create your games?

I use GameMaker Studio 2 to create all our games. GMS2 is, in my opinion, the best engine in existence for creating any 2D game. It comes with a lot of built-in functionality to handle what would otherwise be a major pain in the ass to accomplish with a homemade engine. For most independent developers, I find it hard to justify creating your own engine. It’s 2017, and engines like GameMaker and Unity have come a long way toward making game development more accessible for everyone.

Step One: Build the game for Windows.

I start by creating all my games only for Windows. That’s because I run Windows on my main development laptop, so it’s really easy to make a change to the game and quickly run a test version of it on that same computer.

After the Windows version of the game is relatively stable and complete, it’s time to enter Early Access on Steam. This gives players the opportunity to contribute feedback and report any bugs and crashes they find. The first week or two of Early Access is pretty rough – I normally work about 14-18 hours per day, doing nothing but combing through our forums, fixing game bugs, and releasing game patches to make sure everything is nice and stable. Particularly in the first week, I’ll release up to 10 updates per day to address bugs and crashes. This week is the only time my job becomes truly stressful – it’s a little disheartening for me to think that someone paid money for a product that doesn’t meet their expectations, Early Access or not. When I released Siralim 2 on Early Access, I remember finding a few solutions to major crashes and bugs while I was sleeping – that’s how entrenched in the code I was during that time. And yes, I still make time to shower every day.

Steam is sometimes a bit annoying to work with due to a very “user-unfriendly” backend. It’s very time-consuming to create achievements, especially since our games tend to offer hundreds of them. It also takes a lot of effort to create Steam backgrounds, badges, emoticons, and cards, because these assets have very rigid technical requirements from Valve. I’ve also found that Steam’s approval process is a little cumbersome – each game is reviewed by a human, which is great, but it means that you have to wait a few days for them to check everything over. If there are any issues, you need to correct them, re-submit the game, and wait for someone to review the game all over again.

Step Two: Porting to Mac and Linux.

After the Windows version of the game is relatively stable and I notice that the number of bug/crash reports have dwindled, and I’ve ensured there are no major flaws in the game mechanics that people dislike, it’s time to move on to porting the game to Mac and Linux. This is actually a lot easier than it sounds – GMS2 allows you to compile the exact same game for Windows as all the other platforms, so it’s pretty much just a few clicks of the mouse and I can create a version of the game for Mac and Linux.

One frustrating part of developing games for Mac, however, is that despite their high prices, Mac systems tend to be pretty weak from a hardware perspective. I’ve also found that people like to hang on to their same MacBook from 10 years ago and expect games to run perfectly well on it, so this is a good time for me to start optimizing the game to make it run more smoothly on lower-end hardware.

Many people think that, because Siralim has such primitive graphics, it should be able to run on any system, but that’s simply not true. Siralim has a lot going on behind the scenes: the game needs to manage thousands of objects at a time, generate random dungeons quickly, and process tens of thousands of lines of code during battles thanks to the hundreds of spells and traits available to players at all times. This means that the player’s CPU and RAM are the most significant bottlenecks. GMS2 has a nice debugger that allows me to profile the game and determine which functions take up the most RAM and tax the CPU the hardest. I can quickly find which functions need to be re-written to run faster. Sometimes, this means that I need to re-code entire game systems, but that’s usually not the case.

Linux tends to be a lot easier to work with. For obvious reasons, Linux users tend to be some of the most tech-savvy of all our players, so they’re really good at reporting bugs and crashes with a lot of detail. Linux users also tend to run this OS on higher-end systems, so optimization is typically not as big of an issue as it is with Mac devices.

Once the Mac and Linux versions of the game are ready, I upload them to Steam so Early Access users can play the game on these platforms as well. While I wait for users to report issues with the game on these platforms, I continue to fix any outstanding bugs and crashes, and implement changes based on feedback from our players.

Once I’m confident the game is relatively free of bugs and crashes, and the game is content-complete and the player base tends to be generally happy with what the game offers, it’s time to leave Early Access and officially launch the game on desktop devices. That’s as easy as pressing a “Launch” button in the Steam back-end. Then, it’s time to drink a bottle of bourbon (Woodford Reserve, if you must ask) and watch YouTube for a few days. This is also a great time for me to apologize to friends and family for falling off the face of the earth for a few weeks.


In part 2, we’ll explore the process of porting our games to Android and iOS. If you found this post helpful or interesting, feel free to let me know in the comments, or ask any questions you have!

See you next time!

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