The Negative, Devlog #4: Equipment, How To Upgrade It, And Its Role In End-Game Content

Your monsters can each equip up to 4 pieces of gear. Each monster can only equip gear that belongs to certain “slots” – for example, the Ashen Witch can only equip rings, necklaces, leg armor, and chest armor, while another monster may be able to equip only weapons, shields, rings, and helmets.

Each type of equipment has exclusive properties that are available only to that specific slot. For example, weapons can give a percentage-based boost to Power, while shields do the same for Defense.

Acquisition

Equipment is obtained by defeating monsters, looting treasure chests, and completing quests. Unlike in a lot of other games, you will not be able to craft your own equipment. My hope is that, as you find new equipment, it will naturally and dynamically change the way you approach the game. You can, however, upgrade and slightly modify equipment to suit your needs.

Types of Equipment

There are 7 different types of equipment for you to collect: Helmets, Chest Armor, Leg Armor, Weapons, Shields, Rings, and Necklaces. As I mentioned before, each monster is restricted to being able to equip only 4 of these types of equipment. One monster might be able to equip weapons, while another cannot. This means that, when deciding which monsters to add to your party, you should also consider the type of equipment they can use.

Unique Equipment

The rarest (and most powerful) equipment in the game is called “unique” equipment. While most equipment is randomly generated, I’ve designed the unique equipment by hand. Each piece of unique equipment has a predetermined name, and typically has properties that you won’t find anywhere else. Some of this equipment even grant exclusive skills to your monsters that you won’t find anywhere else. Each monster can only equip one piece of unique equipment.

Upgrading

You can upgrade your equipment by collecting ore and taking it to a blacksmith. Each piece of equipment can be upgraded up to 10 times, with each level making the equipment more powerful than before.

Unique equipment requires a special type of ore called “Godstones”. This ore is much harder to find than normal ore, so you should save it only for when you find a piece of equipment you plan to use for a long time.

Salvaging

The blacksmith can also salvage unwanted equipment, yielding a small amount of ore. This feature is especially useful for when your monsters have out-leveled the usefulness of the equipment in your inventory. You can re-invest the resulting ore into upgrades for new equipment.

Role In End-Game Content

One of the many end-game activities in The Negative revolves around a “loot hunt”, much like ARPGs such as Diablo. After completing the game’s main storyline quests, you’ll be able to challenge ultra-powerful bosses that drop exclusive unique equipment.

Other end-game activities grant you the opportunity to imbue your favorite equipment with new properties. However, since this post isn’t really meant to discuss all of The Negative’s end-game content, I’ll save the details about this for a future post.

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The Negative, Devlog #3: Consumable Items And How To Craft Them

As you journey across the infinite world of The Negative, you’ll encounter two different types of nodes that can be harvested: herbs and ore. Herbs are used to craft various potions and other consumable items, while ore is used to upgrade your monsters’ equipment. Today, we’ll discuss herbs and how they can be used to craft consumable items.

 

All About Herbs

There are 6 types of herbs in the game: Bruiseroot, Cinderleaf, Dragonvine, Fadegrass, Shimmerblossom, and Sorrowseed. While all of these herbs can be found in any environment, some have a better chance to grow in certain areas than others.

To harvest an herb, simply walk up to it and interact with it. Your character will cut down the herb, which will then appear in your inventory.

 

The Alchemist

Each town you visit will have an Alchemist. Alchemists can use your herbs (along with some Zeal) to craft consumable items such as health potions, battle elixirs, and other various tools to aid you in your travels.

 

Potions

The Alchemist allows you to craft several different potions. As you might expect, you can craft healing potions, mana potions, debuff curing potions, elixirs to boost your monsters’ stats in battle, and even Ankhs to bring your monsters back to life when they die. However, herbs aren’t very common in The Negative world, so you should carefully plan which potions you need the most, as well as when to use them.

 

Dungeoneering Tools

Most RPGs offer players maps of the world to help them find their way around. Some games even display an on-screen minimap so players always know their exact location, as well as those of the enemies and even hidden treasure. However, I don’t think maps and minimaps belong in The Negative. The problem with these features is that they take away a lot of a game’s mystery and excitement, and make the game world feel much smaller and less dangerous.

In place of maps, in The Negative you’ll be given various tools to help you find your way around. One of the most basic tools you’ll find is called a Glowstone. Glowstones can be placed on the ground to emit light, illuminating the area and also serving as a trail marker for you when you return to a certain area later on. Glowstones are available in several different colors: red, blue, yellow, green, orange, fuchsia, purple, and white. Note that the art for these is not final, nor is the lighting style itself – the following image is just a proof of concept.

Glowstones are as basic in concept as they are versatile, and will hopefully allow players to devise their own means of navigating around the world.

Glowstones are just one of the many dungeoneering tools you can find or craft in The Negative. For example, Bell of the Lost allows you to instantly teleport to the entrance of a dungeon, while the Homeward Wing allows you to teleport to the nearest town you’ve discovered. Other items focus more on your own survival, such as the Plume of Whispers, which temporarily prevents enemies from being able to see you in the overworld.

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The Negative, Devlog #2: Monsters

In The Negative, battles are primarily fought with the help of up to 4 monsters of your choice. You can customize these monsters to suit your needs. There are currently 120 monsters planned for you to collect, and each one is unique in terms of aesthetics, stats, skills, and the types of items they can equip. This post will provide you with an in-depth look at how monsters work in The Negative!

 

Monster Classes

Each monster belongs to one of 6 classes: Chaos, Death, Life, Nature, Sorcery, or Void. A monster’s class is primarily defined only for roleplaying flavor, but some skills and items also interact with specific classes as well. Monster fusion (the process of combining two monsters into a new one, which will be discussed in a future post) makes use of the class system as well.

Acquiring Monsters

You can acquire monsters in several different ways. The most straightforward way is to weaken an enemy monster in battle, then capture its essence using an item called an “Amulet”. You’ll want to make sure you stock up on Amulets before venturing outside of a town – you never know when you’ll encounter a monster you want to add to your party.

However, some monsters can’t be captured this way, and can only be obtained by completing certain quests or by fusing other monsters together to create new ones. The rarest monsters in the game cannot be captured, so you’ll need to explore every corner of the world in search of hints to point you toward the most coveted ones.

 

Monster Stats

Monsters have several different stats that affect their fighting abilities. These stats can be improved by leveling up your monsters, equipping them with more powerful gear, or using special elixirs in battle to temporarily bolster their strength.

Health: when a monster takes damage, it loses Health. If it falls to zero, the monster dies. Health does not regenerate after battle, so you’ll want to keep a supply of potions on hand to ensure your survival.

Mana: monsters can use skills in battle, and these cost a certain amount of Mana. Much like Health, Mana does not regenerate after battle.

Power: determines the potency of the monster’s attacks and skills. The higher a monster’s power, the more damage and healing it’ll do, and the more effective its debuffs and stat reductions will be.

Defense: determines the amount of damage a monster takes from incoming attacks and skills. Higher defense means your monster will take less damage from all sources.

Speed: determines the rate at which monsters can take a turn in battle to attack, use a skill or item, defend, or move to a new area on the battle grid. Extremely fast monsters can take multiple turns before others get the opportunity to take even one!

Luck: determines the chance and potency that monsters have to deal critical damage or dodge attacks and skills. Some skills also utilize Luck to affect their potency.

Resistances: monsters take more or less damage from each of the 6 classes depending on their resistances. Unlike all the other stats mentioned above, Resistances are the only stats that do not increase as a monster levels up. Resistances are determined by the type of monster, and can only be increased by equipping certain items or using elixirs in battle.

 

Personalities

Each monster has a certain personality which affects their stat growth each time they level up. For example, an Analytical monster gains more Mana and Speed than non-Analytical monsters when they level up, but also gains less Power and Defense. You may need to capture multiple monsters of the same type before finding one that has the personality you want.

 

Skills

Monsters have two types of skills: active and passive. Active skills must be used manually in combat and cost a certain amount of Mana. These skills can be used to damage enemies, heal allies, afflict nasty debuffs or grant helpful buffs to monsters, and much more. Passive skills are always activated, and tend to be more straightforward than active skills – they might increase the monster’s stats by a certain amount, grant them immunity to a certain debuff, or even do something more interesting like summon a skeleton ally at the start of battle.

Each monster will learn different skills as they level up. Each monster can have up to 4 active and 4 passive skills, and if a monster tries to learn any more than that amount, you must delete a skill first. However, monsters can surpass this limit by equipping certain items. For example, there’s a shield that grants the equipped monster the “Shield Toss” skill. This skill can’t be learned by any monster in the game and is exclusive to this item!

Monsters can also pass their skills on to their offspring after fusing two monsters together, but as I’ve said before, that won’t be discussed in this post. See you next week!

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The Negative, Devlog #1: An Overview of the Game

Today marks the start of a weekly (or sometimes bi-weekly) series of development updates for The Negative! Each post will give you an in-depth look at a certain feature associated with the game. In today’s post, we’ll discuss the general flow of the game (that is, a brief overview of how the game is played), and also reveal a unique game mechanic called “Positivity”.

Please note that any visuals shared in these posts are simply meant to serve as proofs of concept. A lot of the game’s art isn’t finalized, and we’re still using a lot of placeholders. In particular, the tileset we’re using to show off today’s features is a placeholder and probably won’t make it into the final game.

General Gameplay

Players will start their journey in an environment modeled after the concept of “Depression”. This environment takes place in a giant set of ruins that have been long ago abandoned, and consumed by snow and ice. Many of the objects and quests in this environment are related to snowfall (yes, The Negative has dynamic weather effects), and some objects can be used to manipulate the severity of the snow. Each environment has a “gimmick” similar to this one. The goal is for each environment to cause players to play the game in different ways.

The Negative features dynamic weather effects, such as snow, rain, wind, and even ashfall.

Players must seek out towns (which are also procedurally generated) to complete a series of quests related to Depression, ultimately culminating to a major boss fight. In total, the player will travel through all seven of the branches of negativity as discussed in my last post: depression, rage, guilt, jealousy, pessimism, anxiety, and grief. The game’s story concludes with one final boss fight.

Each environment also contains several “sub-environments” that players can enter. You might stumble upon a cave or an abandoned tower that you can explore. At the end of this sub-environment will be a powerful enemy that you can kill, rewarding you with a large treasure chest. These sub-environments are generally optional, although some main story quests and side-quests might require you to defeat a boss contained within. Be warned: these areas tend to be much more challenging than anything you’ll find outside!

In order to give players the feeling of an open world, you might encounter dynamic quests during your travels. Maybe an NPC is being harassed by a pack of enemies, or a totem is being channeled by a powerful foe to empower enemies in the area. These quests are entirely optional but are intended to make the world feel more alive.

One of the many different types of treasure chests you’ll encounter during your travels. This is a rare one, and probably contains something powerful!

After you visit a world for the first time, you can visit it again any time you want – it’s permanent. This means that the more you play the game, the larger your world will become. At any point in time, you can go back and visit the same NPCs and explore the same dungeons that you’ve encountered before. There are also a few items you can use to manipulate these worlds after you’ve conquered them.

After completing the main story quests, you can progress to the post-game content, which will be discussed in greater detail in a later blog post.

Battles

Later on, I’ll dedicate at least one full blog post to discussing battles, but I’ll also give you a brief overview of them right now.

During your travels, you’ll come across a wide array of enemies. Some will chase you, while others will flee when they see you, depending on the monsters’ behavior. Others will simply patrol an area, stay in place, or ignore you altogether. Some are fast, some are slow. Enemies can be caught in traps to hinder their movement. They are even affected by the weather – they’ll move more slowly when it’s snowing, and won’t be able to see you as easily when it’s foggy. When you make contact with an enemy, a battle will begin.

Enemies take the form of “The Negative” in the overworld. When you touch them, a battle begins, and the enemy monsters contained within The Negative are revealed.

Battles are turn-based, and you can use up to four of the monsters you capture to fight for you. Monsters can attack, defend, use a skill, use an item, or move to a different area on the battlefield. After you defeat the enemies, your monsters will gain some experience points, and your character will gain the game’s currency: Zeal.

Zeal and Positivity

Zeal is used for just about everything. It is used to buy items, craft items, enhance your equipment, fuse your monsters into new ones, and much more. But Zeal’s most important use is to level up your character. Unlike your monsters, who gain experience points after each battle, your character can only level up by spending Zeal. In addition, your monsters’ levels cannot exceed that of your character. Of course, your monsters can continue to earn experience points even while your character’s level is inhibiting their growth, so the experience points your monsters gain will never go to waste.

The amount of Zeal your character has also affects its level of “Positivity”. In The Negative, your character emits a small amount of light all around it, and you can’t see very well outside of that light radius. Enemies can ambush you very easily, and it’s more difficult to see useful objects such as treasure chests and ore nodes when your light radius is short. You can expand this light radius by holding more Zeal. This means that players will sometimes need to make difficult decisions about which items to buy, when to level up, and when to explore the world. Should you buy that health potion to ensure your survival, or hold on to your Zeal so you can see farther into the distance? Some items can only be seen when your character is 100% “Positive”, which causes the light around your character to become golden.

Your character’s light radius grows as you gain more Zeal, allowing you to see farther into the distance, and sometimes even reveal hidden secrets.

If your party is wiped out, you’ll drop all your Zeal on the ground. You’ll have one opportunity to find and retrieve it, but if you die again before retrieving your lost Zeal, it’s gone forever. That’s what I meant in my last post when I mentioned that The Negative feels a lot like taking one step forward and two steps back. Your character’s Positivity is cyclical, and will come and go countless times as you progress through the game. You’ll be forced to make difficult decisions and will sometimes suffer unavoidable hardships as you’re forced to sacrifice one boon for another.

When you use Zeal to buy items or level up your character, your light radius also decreases. In that way, positivity and negativity are cyclical.


I hope you enjoyed our first devlog for The Negative! See you soon.

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Announcing Our New Game, “The Negative”!

 

I am pleased to announce Thylacine Studios’ next game: The Negative!

 

A mockup image containing a few objects and NPCs you might find during your travels.

 

The Negative is an evocative RPG with a dark, gritty, and gothic undertone. Players take the role of a nameless plague doctor as they wander across an infinite, procedurally generated open world in an attempt to conquer an evil force known as The Negative. Along the way, players must capture and employ the skills of enemy monsters to fight for them.

 

Battles are turn-based. You can take up to 4 monsters with you to fight your enemies.

 

Thematically, The Negative is all about conveying emotion; not only through its storytelling methods, but also in the environments and enemies themselves. I’ve broken down the concept of negativity into 7 main categories: depression, rage, jealousy, pessimism, guilt, anxiety, and grief. Almost every aspect of the game relates to one of these emotions in some way – there are 7 different environments to explore (and re-explore), each of which is modeled after one of these seven emotions. This means that, with a few exceptions, we won’t be using any generic environment types you might find in other games, such as a “fire world” or “forest area”.

 

You can move your monsters around the battlefield to gain various advantages and exploit your enemies’ weaknesses.

 

The Negative definitely isn’t a happy game, and it’s unapologetic in the way it casts players into a lonely, desolate world where all hope feels lost. In most cases, players will often find their efforts feeling like they’re taking an allegorical “one step forward, two steps back”. In that way, it feels a lot like real life. Happiness is cyclical, and The Negative honors that fact in every way it can.

 

This is the inventory screen. You can heal your monsters, resurrect them, and much more here.

 

I have plenty more information to share with you, but it’ll have to wait. Check back next week to learn more about The Negative! I’ll leave you with a small FAQ.

Q. When will The Negative be released?
A. It’s too soon to tell. I have probably 70% of the game coded already, but there’s a lot more work to be done, especially in the art/music department. My best guess is an early 2018 beta release on Steam Early Access. While we’re waiting, I’ll possibly release at least one smaller game to sate your appetite.

Q. What platforms will The Negative be released on?
A. Definitely Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, and Playstation 4. I’d also like to release this game on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch, but it’s too soon to tell if we can make this happen. If any other major platforms enter the market between now and the end of The Negative’s development cycle, I’ll gladly consider those as well.

Q. What about Playstation Vita?
A. I’m developing The Negative using GameMaker Studio 2, which no longer supports Playstation Vita, so there’s no way this is going to happen. Sorry!

Q. How much will it cost?
A. Right now, I’m thinking $19.99 USD is a fair price, but that’s not final. The mobile (Android/iOS) version will likely use a different payment model.

Q. What are the controls like?
A. The game supports keyboards, gamepads, and mice. You can play the entire game with just your mouse, which actually works really well!

Q. Will there be any post-release content? Expansions? Sequels?
A. Yes, probably. If it happens, this content will be delivered and priced in a way that no other game has done so before. I’m excited to experiment with my own payment model, but it’s too soon to announce any specifics on that!

Q. Does The Negative have multiplayer?
A. No, there are no plans to add multiplayer content for now. There might be some online-only events, but nothing like trading or PvP battling.

Q. How does The Negative compare to Siralim?
A. It’s completely different in almost every way. You still capture monsters and fight with them, but everything else is completely different.

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Details – Siralim: Invasion and Siralim 2: Renaissance

As many of you know, Siralim: Invasion was released late last week on Steam and itch.io (Windows, Mac, Linux), in addition to Google Play (Android). As I started to write this post, I received an e-mail from Apple saying that they’re reviewing the patch for iOS as we speak. Playstation users might need to wait a little while longer, as I haven’t been able to submit the patch yet since the process is a bit more involved than all the other platforms (a lot of “wait and see” – but I’m doing everything I can on my end, rest assured!). In the end, I’ll be surprised if the patch isn’t available on all remaining platforms by the end of the week!

In addition, I’m also working on releasing both Siralim and Siralim 2 on Amazon Underground. This means that the games will be completely free – including their in-app purchases – on Android if you have the Amazon Underground app. I’ll get paid by Amazon for every minute players spend playing these games, so I figured games with infinite playability would do pretty well on there. At the very least, I figured this would be an interesting experiment considering it’s an all-new payment model that no company other than Amazon has tried yet.

Last week, I promised that I’d dive into details about how the two new “mini-expansions” work for Siralim and Siralim 2. However, there’s not much to say about the patch for Siralim that hasn’t already been revealed, so instead, let’s take a closer look at the patch for Siralim 2.


Daily Realms

Daily Realms are unlocked via a mid-level castle upgrade. After that, you can visit an NPC in the main room in Siralim to open a portal to a Daily Realm. You can complete a Daily Realm once per day, which also increases your Daily Realm Streak by 1. If you die or exit the game while in a Daily Realm, your completion streak will be reset back to 1.

Enemies in Daily Realms scale in level and Gene Strength to those of your own creatures, similar to how Sigils and God Battles work. Enemies will not grow more powerful after a Daily Realm Streak of 10.

If you manage to complete the Realm Quest in a Daily Realm, not only will your Daily Realm Streak increase, but you’ll also receive an increasingly better reward based on your streak. Rewards always include some Spell Gem crafting components to be used in the Arcane Refinery, along with a chance to receive a Fleshwarper Coin. At a Daily Realm Streak of 10 or higher, you will always receive a Fleshwarper Coin.

Unlike in the first Siralim game, no stats are tracked or displayed to players in Siralim 2’s Daily Realms. These statistics would have made it impossible for me to add Daily Realms to the Playstation version of the patch, so I decided to omit that functionality entirely.

New Game Plus

New Game Plus is a new option unlocked at the title screen. You can unlock it by either defeating the final boss of the main storyline, or by holding down the right-directional button (default “D” on keyboards) for a few seconds. After that, you can choose “New Game Plus” and start a new save file.

When you start a new file under New Game Plus, you’ll start in a different room than normal. This room contains several NPCs that allow you to toggle certain in-game options that will affect the way you play the game. Below is a list of options, along with a description of each one if necessary:

Random Creature Mode – in the normal game, the order in which creatures are unlocked in the wild is always the same, no matter how many new games you start. With this mode enabled, you could encounter a Diabolic Nemesis starting at realm level 1. The first 50 creatures that are unlocked can be extracted from, so there’s no need for them to be in your bestiary first. This mode should give the game a tremendous amount of replay value.

Extract Anything Mode – this mode allows you to extract a Core from any creature without it needing to be in your bestiary first.

Classic Mode – greatly decreases the amount of resources, experience points, and items you’ll gain throughout the game. This mode is intended to make the game feel more hardcore, and from my own experience, it makes the game feel a lot more rewarding and satisfying.

Ignore Gene Strength – with this mode enabled, creatures will always have zero Gene Strength. This includes your creatures and enemy creatures.

Start With All Cores – allows you to start the game with one of every Core already in your inventory. No, that doesn’t include the Mimic or any other creature that is otherwise unobtainable. This option also adds an NPC to the summoning chamber that allows you to delete all the Cores in your inventory. That way, you can start the game with a creature team of your choice, then delete all your Cores in case you don’t want to spoil the element of extracting Cores from new creatures later on.

Start With All Spell Gems – allows you to start the game with one of every Spell Gem already in your inventory. None of these Spell Gems have any properties.

Start With Extra Resources – allows you to start the game with 10x as many resources (Brimstone, Crystal, Essence, Granite, and Power) as normal.

Start With All Breeding Recipes – allows you to start the game with all the breeding recipes already known.

Start With Double Speed – allows you to move at double your normal speed in the castle and in realms without needing to unlock anything.

You’re probably noticing that there’s no permadeath option listed here. Permadeath won’t be added to Siralim 2. Cloud saving makes this option obsolete and pointless, not to mention that a permadeath mode introduces a lot of technical bugs that are difficult to work past.

Retro Skins

40 new skins have been added to the game: one from each of the original creature races in the first Siralim game before it received a graphics overhaul. While I think all of the battle sprites still look really good, some of the overworld sprites leave something to be desired. You’ve been warned.

Here are a few screenshots of some of these skins:


I’m hoping to release the Siralim 2 patch shortly after I’ve finished deploying the patch for Siralim 1 on all platforms. Shouldn’t be much longer now!

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Free content updates for Siralim and Siralim 2 are coming!

While I’ve been hard at work on my next game (which will be announced very soon – promise!), I’ve also found time to work on Siralim and Siralim 2 just a little bit longer. The beauty of these games is that, even though they’re both already packed to the brim with content, there’s always room to add even more.

With that said, both Siralim and Siralim 2 will each receive one final content update. Today, I’ll reveal a brief overview of what you can expect in both of these updates.

Siralim: Invasion

Let’s start with Siralim’s update, called “Invasion”. First and foremost, the game will finally be brought to the same version as what is already available on Playstation. This means that all the game’s NPCs and character sprites will be overhauled. They look a lot better than the old ones, and this change should single-handedly make the game much more pleasurable to play.

Additionally, 12 new creatures will be added to Siralim. Two of these creatures are the Steampowered Pilwiz and Pumking, which are no longer tied to exclusive seasonal events and can instead be found in the wild. I’ll reveal some of the other new creatures next week, along with a first look at some of their abilities.

But that’s not at all! I’m also adding a new battle speed option called “Ultra Turbo Mode”. When this option is enabled, you’ll be able to hold down the confirmation button to quickly cycle through battle commands. No need to tap the button dozens of times per battle anymore!

One other major change is that the “Crown of Haste” item will now work in realms, in addition to your castle.

Siralim 2: Renaissance

Siralim 2’s update will be called “Renaissance”. The biggest feature included in this patch is the addition of a “New Game Plus” option. This feature allows you to start a new game with several options of your choice. Some of these options include starting the game with all breeding recipes unlocked, or an option that allows you to extract Cores from any creature in the game. There’s also a “Random Creature Mode” that unlocks new creatures in the wild in a random order, which should make starting a new game much more interesting. There are over 10 of these options available, and I’ll announce the full list very soon!

Another new feature included in Renaissance is the addition of “Daily Realms”. Once per day, players will be able to journey to a new realm that contains enemies scaled to your own creatures’ levels. Upon completing this realm, you’ll have a chance to earn a Fleshwarper Coin and several Spell Gem crafting components. Interestingly, all players will get to experience the same exact realm (including its layout, enemies, and items) as each other.

Renaissance also includes dozens of new skins for you to collect for your creatures. But these aren’t just any normal skins – these are retro-style skins from the original creature graphics in the first Siralim game – the ones that were used while the game was still in beta testing! I’ll post some screenshots of these later on.

Check back next week for a more in-depth look at these updates!

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New App Icons for Siralim and Siralim 2!

At some point in the near future, we’ll be rolling out a new update for Siralim and Siralim 2 on most platforms to give them some new app icons. These were created by the same artist that drew our Siralim 2 title screen, Janette Ramos.

While these icons don’t necessarily use an art style that is consistent with their respective games’ pixel art, I think they represent the games in a much more professional light than their older counterparts. The first thing players see before they purchase a game – especially on mobile devices – is the app icon, and it’s safe to say the old ones weren’t doing us any favors toward reaching new customers.

As you can probably see for yourself, this artwork is hand painted. Janette has done an excellent job with these new icons, and we’re excited to work with her on future projects as well! I wonder what this next one is for?

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Introducing Our New Merchandise Shop!

You’ve been asking for it, and now it’s finally here: a merchandise shop for Thylacine Studios’ games!

Choose from over a dozen shirts and hoodies (in the colors and sizes of your choice!) featuring your favorite Siralim and Siralim 2 characters. We also have coffee mugs, mousepads, and posters available that feature the official Siralim and Siralim 2 title screen art.

We plan to add many more products to the shop over time, including phone cases, laptop decals, notebooks, calendars, seasonal/holiday accessories, and much more! Want to make a request for something you’d like to see in our store? Feel free to contact us.

Click here to check it out!

 

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The Siralim Card Game That Never Was

During the development of Siralim 2, we also began working on a physical, collectible card game based on the original Siralim video game. Ultimately, the idea was scrapped for reasons that won’t be discussed here. However, a lot of people have expressed interest in a potential card game so I thought it might be interesting to show off the prototype.

Before I begin, I want to reiterate that this card game will never be released. It’s possible that a digital version of it might happen someday, but I have absolutely no plans to release anything like that for now. This post is merely to show off the prototype for this game before it was ultimately scrapped. The entire game was designed by our former graphics artist, with concepts taken from Siralim and Siralim 2 including creature traits, artifacts, and other key gameplay elements.

Let’s start with a brief explanation about how the game is played. The Siralim CCG (Collectible Card Game) is a 1 versus 1 card game that pits your creatures against those of your friends. To win, you’ll need to defeat all of your opponent’s creatures. Just like in the video games, you’ll need to create a party of creatures that work well with each other based on their traits, and equip them with suitable artifacts in order to gain an advantage over your opponent.

There’s one creature card for every creature race in Siralim 1. For example, instead of having multiple creatures that belong to the same race such as the “Diabolic Henchman” and “Diabolic Observer”, the CCG instead only has one creature to represent this race: the “Diabolic Horde”. Your deck will contain exactly six creatures of your choice, along with an accompanying artifact card for each one.

Next, you’ll need to fill out your deck with a bunch of items and spells to attain a total of 50 cards in your entire deck. While many of the spells work similarly to those found in Siralim and Siralim 2, the items were created from the ground up – specifically for the card game! Some items are used to empower your creatures with increased stats, while others are used to cure a debuff or recover some of your creatures’ Health pools.

Once both players have their decks built and are ready to play, a coin is flipped to determine who goes first. Both players take turns iterating through the four main phases of gameplay until one player runs out of living creature cards.

The first phase is called the Replenishment Phase. Most actions the player takes – including attacking or casting a spell – requires a certain amount of Energy. During this phase, the player’s Energy is restored. In addition, certain “Beginning of Turn” effects can occur at this time. For example, true to their functionality in Siralim, the Troll causes damage to a random enemy creature.

The second phase is called the Draw Phase. During this phase, the player draws enough cards to hold a total of seven cards in their hand. Simple enough.

Next comes the Main Phase. This is when the player can choose an action for each of their six creatures. Creatures can attack, use an active ability (trait), cast a spell, or simply do nothing at all. Generally, each creature will only have enough Energy for one action per turn, but certain spells and other effects allow some creatures to take multiple actions per turn.

Lastly, we have the End Phase. Nothing too exciting happens here – some “End of Turn” effects occur and that’s about it.

Attack damage, spell damage, and the effectiveness of certain traits and items are affected by the creatures’ stats. There are four stats in the Siralim CCG: Attack, Health, Speed, and Intelligence. These stats are listed in order from top to bottom on the left side of each creature card.

Attack – determines attack damage.

Health – when a creature runs out of Health, it dies.

Speed – determines the order in which the creature attacks during the Main Phase.

Intelligence – determines the potency of spells the creature casts.

 

As I said before, both players take turns attacking, casting spells, and using items on their creatures until one player’s party is completely wiped out, with the surviving player being the winner. Some effects require the use of tokens (to symbolize the game’s debuffs: Poisoned, Asleep, Blinded, Cursed, and Confused), while others make use of dice to calculate effects that deal with randomized numbers.

…and that’s about it. There are a few other minor details associated with the game, but that’s pretty much the gist of it. For that reason, this card game didn’t turn out to be anywhere near as fun as the video games, which is one of the many reasons why this project was cancelled. It’s entertaining enough for a few matches, but it’s definitely not something you’d want to play in the long term.

I’ll leave you with a few more pictures of some other cards. Notice how the creatures were all designed to work the same way they do in the video games.

See you next week!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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