Siralim of Old (Part 3)

Welcome to the third and final part of our look back on Siralim’s early development! Last week, we took a glimpse at the game’s music and sound effect design, and then proceeded to make fun of the user interface.

I think today’s post is going to be the most interesting of the series because it contains a bunch of features that were cut from the final version of the game. Let’s get right into it!


 Crafting

The Blacksmith offered the following options:

  1. Forging. This worked the same way that it does now.
  2. Salvaging. Instead of yielding materials, this function simply gave you some resources.
  3. Venturing. You could purchase a completely random artifact. This was meant to be similar to “gambling” in ARPGs like Diablo 2. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out that way in practice and led to lots of inventory clutter and frustration.

The Enchanter offered the following options:

  1. Enchanting. You could simply choose from a pre-defined list of properties to add to your artifacts.
  2. Augmenting. This added a completely random property to your artifact, but the values were much higher than if you had used Enchanting instead. For example, Attack might have had a maximum of 500 when you were enchanting, but it could have been 700 when you were Augmenting. In other words, you sacrificed control for power. So yes, this was bad and no one used it.
  3. Disenchanting. Same as always.

As you probably guessed, “Venturing” and “Augmenting” were removed early on.

When the game entered beta testing, I added a new type of item called “Materials” to the game that work the same way as they do now. The game started with 250 different materials, which made loot a lot more interesting!

Unique Artifacts

You could sometimes find unique artifacts that I pre-defined by hand. They had unique names and offered unique stats and traits that you couldn’t find anywhere else. If you’ve played Diablo, Path of Exile, or any other game that utilizes this type of itemization system, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.

Right before the game entered beta, there was a bug that caused artifacts to always be unique, so players were able to acquire god-like artifacts after farming for only a few minutes. Fortunately, unique artifacts were removed shortly after the bug was fixed.

Weird Artifact Properties

You were able to find artifacts that had several properties that were later removed. These properties were difficult to balance, unwieldy, outright useless, or a combination of the three. Here are some examples:

  • Replace Ability With – this property replaced your creature’s ability (trait) with a different one.
  • Increased Quantity of Treasure
  • Increased Rarity of Treasure
  • Chance to Not Consume Scroll Charges (even the name of this property was bad!)
  • Increased [STAT] While Defending
  • Increased [STAT] While Provoking

Artifacts – No Limits!

In early alpha, players were able to enchant their artifacts an unlimited number of times. While the resource cost increased with each subsequent enchantment, this “feature” caused the game to quickly spiral out of control in the late-game.  Artifacts pretty much made all other parts of the game obsolete because the increase in stats eventually made most traits and spells obsolete.

Luckily, during this time, players couldn’t add traits to their artifacts.

Randomly Generated Artifact Names

Artifacts were automatically assigned a name based on their properties. For example, if your sword granted a large amount of Attack and Defense, the artifact might be called “Sharp Rapier of the Turtle”. The prefix of each artifact was based on the artifact’s highest stat, while the suffix was based on the artifact’s second highest stat. The object name (Sword, Rapier, Katana, etc) was chosen at random based on the type of artifact.

Unfortunately, this system turned out to make artifact management really tedious. There were so many words for players to read in each artifact name that your inventory list looked like an essay.

Spell Woes

Some spells cost Power Balance instead of Mana to cast. As you might imagine, that was incredibly annoying, and no one ever used those spells.

Some of the spells that cost Power Balance were able to be cast in the overworld. One spell, Farsight, still exists in Siralim. Others, such as Summon Death, which caused a fight to immediately start with a pack of Death creatures, were changed to have in-battle effects instead.

Another interesting note is that Spell Power didn’t exist at first. Instead, your spells’ damage was based on a percentage of the enemy’s Maximum Health. In other words, no matter what level the enemy creatures were, your Fireball spell would always deal damage equal to 40% of their Maximum Health. This caused pretty much all stats to be ignored in favor of collecting spells, which is why Spell Power was later added to the game.’

Spellcrafting

This feature was never released to the public, nor did I ever mention it before now: players were able to collect components to craft their own spell scrolls.

Here’s how it worked:

  1. Collect Parchment. This is a component that determines the core function of the spell. There was different Parchment for each main function that a spell could have: damage, healing, buffing, etc.
  2. Collect Ink. This determined the potency of the spell. Different types of Ink yielded different potencies: weak, average, strong, etc.
  3. Combine your Parchment with your Ink, and choose the spell animation and sound effect that you want to use.
  4. You could pay extra resources to increase the number of scroll charges.
  5. The mana cost of the spell was calculated based on the function of the spell and that function’s potency.
  6. The name of the spell was generated similar to the way artifact names were randomly generated.

It was a fun concept, but it wasn’t actually that great in practice. Ultimately, this idea resurfaced in Siralim 2 and 3 in the form of randomly generated spell gems.

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