Siralim 3 is coming to Switch on July 5, 2019!

I am excited beyond words to announce that Siralim 3 will be available for Nintendo Switch on July 5 of this year!

As most of you know, the Siralim series is heavily inspired by an old Gameboy game called Dragon Warrior Monsters. There was always something cool about being able to carry a game as massive as DWM around with you in your pocket, and finally, you’ll be able to do the same with Siralim. I’ve been play-testing Siralim 3 on my Switch for the last several weeks and I am so, so happy with how the port turned out. Siralim truly feels at home on a Nintendo system, and I can’t wait to share it with you.

If you’re as excited about this launch as I am, feel free to head over to the store page on Nintendo’s website and check it out now: https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/siralim-3-switch/

I know that many of you have a lot of questions about the Switch launch, so I’ve prepared a list of FAQTNAAY (frequently asked questions that nobody actually asked yet):

 

Q. In what regions will the Switch version of Siralim 3 be available?

A. It will be available in the North American, European, and Australian regions. The launch date is the same for all regions.

 

Q. How much will it cost?

A. $14.99 USD in the North American region, and 14.99 euros in the European region. If you are from a country that uses a different currency, Nintendo will convert these prices to your local currency automatically.

 

Q. Are there any features missing from the Switch version that are included in the Steam/mobile versions of the game?

A. No, all platforms have the same exact features.

 

Q. Even holiday events, Tavern Brawls, cross-platform cloud saving, and other online content?

A. Yes. It’s all included in the Switch version, just as it is with other consoles.

 

Q. Will you ever release physical copies of Siralim 3 for Switch?

A. I really doubt it. Anything is possible, but unless the digital sales are really good and a publisher decides to help us out, it’s probably not a feasible option.

 

Q. Will you release Siralim and Siralim 2 on Switch?

A. No, those games were created with a different engine, so I’d need to port them to Siralim 3’s engine first… and for as long as that would take me to do, I could create a whole new game during that time.

 

Siralim of Old (Part 3)

Welcome to the third and final part of our look back on Siralim’s early development! Last week, we took a glimpse at the game’s music and sound effect design, and then proceeded to make fun of the user interface.

I think today’s post is going to be the most interesting of the series because it contains a bunch of features that were cut from the final version of the game. Let’s get right into it!


 Crafting

The Blacksmith offered the following options:

  1. Forging. This worked the same way that it does now.
  2. Salvaging. Instead of yielding materials, this function simply gave you some resources.
  3. Venturing. You could purchase a completely random artifact. This was meant to be similar to “gambling” in ARPGs like Diablo 2. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out that way in practice and led to lots of inventory clutter and frustration.

The Enchanter offered the following options:

  1. Enchanting. You could simply choose from a pre-defined list of properties to add to your artifacts.
  2. Augmenting. This added a completely random property to your artifact, but the values were much higher than if you had used Enchanting instead. For example, Attack might have had a maximum of 500 when you were enchanting, but it could have been 700 when you were Augmenting. In other words, you sacrificed control for power. So yes, this was bad and no one used it.
  3. Disenchanting. Same as always.

As you probably guessed, “Venturing” and “Augmenting” were removed early on.

When the game entered beta testing, I added a new type of item called “Materials” to the game that work the same way as they do now. The game started with 250 different materials, which made loot a lot more interesting!

Unique Artifacts

You could sometimes find unique artifacts that I pre-defined by hand. They had unique names and offered unique stats and traits that you couldn’t find anywhere else. If you’ve played Diablo, Path of Exile, or any other game that utilizes this type of itemization system, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about.

Right before the game entered beta, there was a bug that caused artifacts to always be unique, so players were able to acquire god-like artifacts after farming for only a few minutes. Fortunately, unique artifacts were removed shortly after the bug was fixed.

Weird Artifact Properties

You were able to find artifacts that had several properties that were later removed. These properties were difficult to balance, unwieldy, outright useless, or a combination of the three. Here are some examples:

  • Replace Ability With – this property replaced your creature’s ability (trait) with a different one.
  • Increased Quantity of Treasure
  • Increased Rarity of Treasure
  • Chance to Not Consume Scroll Charges (even the name of this property was bad!)
  • Increased [STAT] While Defending
  • Increased [STAT] While Provoking

Artifacts – No Limits!

In early alpha, players were able to enchant their artifacts an unlimited number of times. While the resource cost increased with each subsequent enchantment, this “feature” caused the game to quickly spiral out of control in the late-game.  Artifacts pretty much made all other parts of the game obsolete because the increase in stats eventually made most traits and spells obsolete.

Luckily, during this time, players couldn’t add traits to their artifacts.

Randomly Generated Artifact Names

Artifacts were automatically assigned a name based on their properties. For example, if your sword granted a large amount of Attack and Defense, the artifact might be called “Sharp Rapier of the Turtle”. The prefix of each artifact was based on the artifact’s highest stat, while the suffix was based on the artifact’s second highest stat. The object name (Sword, Rapier, Katana, etc) was chosen at random based on the type of artifact.

Unfortunately, this system turned out to make artifact management really tedious. There were so many words for players to read in each artifact name that your inventory list looked like an essay.

Spell Woes

Some spells cost Power Balance instead of Mana to cast. As you might imagine, that was incredibly annoying, and no one ever used those spells.

Some of the spells that cost Power Balance were able to be cast in the overworld. One spell, Farsight, still exists in Siralim. Others, such as Summon Death, which caused a fight to immediately start with a pack of Death creatures, were changed to have in-battle effects instead.

Another interesting note is that Spell Power didn’t exist at first. Instead, your spells’ damage was based on a percentage of the enemy’s Maximum Health. In other words, no matter what level the enemy creatures were, your Fireball spell would always deal damage equal to 40% of their Maximum Health. This caused pretty much all stats to be ignored in favor of collecting spells, which is why Spell Power was later added to the game.’

Spellcrafting

This feature was never released to the public, nor did I ever mention it before now: players were able to collect components to craft their own spell scrolls.

Here’s how it worked:

  1. Collect Parchment. This is a component that determines the core function of the spell. There was different Parchment for each main function that a spell could have: damage, healing, buffing, etc.
  2. Collect Ink. This determined the potency of the spell. Different types of Ink yielded different potencies: weak, average, strong, etc.
  3. Combine your Parchment with your Ink, and choose the spell animation and sound effect that you want to use.
  4. You could pay extra resources to increase the number of scroll charges.
  5. The mana cost of the spell was calculated based on the function of the spell and that function’s potency.
  6. The name of the spell was generated similar to the way artifact names were randomly generated.

It was a fun concept, but it wasn’t actually that great in practice. Ultimately, this idea resurfaced in Siralim 2 and 3 in the form of randomly generated spell gems.

Siralim 3 – PlayStation 4 Release FAQ

Siralim 3 will be released for PlayStation 4 in North America on March 29! I’ve been receiving a lot of questions about this release, so I wanted to write a quick list of FAQs here to give you a better idea about what to expect about this release. If you have any other questions, feel free to post in the comments!

 

Q. How much will Siralim 3 cost for PlayStation 4?

A. Siralim 3 costs $14.99 USD on PS4, which is consistent with the Steam version of the game, as well as other consoles.

 

Q. At what time will the game be available on March 29?

A. I don’t have access to that information, but games are typically released at 9am PST, so that’s my best guess.

 

Q. Are there any differences between the PS4 version of the game and the desktop/mobile versions?

A. The only difference is that our cross-platform cloud saving features are not available in the PS4 version of the game. In other words, you can’t share your desktop/mobile save files with the PS4 version.

 

Q. Will Siralim 3’s optional online content be available on the PS4 version of the game?

A. Yes. Tavern Brawls, as well as all in-game events and holidays, are available on PS4. In addition, you can redeem codes to receive creatures just like you can in the desktop/mobile versions of the game.

 

Q. Will the PS4 version of the game continue to receive updates just like the desktop/mobile versions?

A. Yes. In fact, I have a console patch prepared for release shortly after the game launches on PS4. All future bug/crash fixes will be released for PS4 as well. The goal is to keep all versions of that game up-to-date.

 

Q. Why is Siralim 3 only being released for PS4 in North America? What happened to Europe?

A. Siralim 3 will be released in the EU region at a later date. I will post an update with a release date as soon as I can. Thanks for your patience!

 

Siralim of Old (Part 2)

Last week, we took a look back at how Siralim’s graphics evolved over time.

It was interesting to hear everyone’s responses to the post. Some people assured me that the game wasn’t as ugly as I made it out to be (thanks, but there’s no need to lie on my behalf!). Others seem to really dislike Oleg. As it turns out, we’ve all known an “Oleg” at some point in our lives. My advice to you is to cut that son of a [email protected]#$% out of your life and let him drive through his own [email protected]#$ing snowstorms.

Ahem. Sorry. I don’t normally lose my composure mid-blog post.


As promised, I’ll continue this series today with a look at how the game’s music/sound and user interface came together.

Music and Sound

I enjoy music. So much, in fact, that I originally decided that I’d record my own music for Siralim. After all, I used to play the trumpet (first chair, might I add) in junior high school, and no, I never got beat up for it. My craft was a careful balance of trying to fight off asthma attacks mid-song and knowing when to unleash my spit valves all over the nearest carpeted floor. In many ways, that was the peak of my existence. There was something about playing Jingle Bells for my cat as she desperately tried to claw her way out of my bedroom that made me feel like a real artist.

Fortunately for you, I quickly realized that most people probably wouldn’t want to listen to 15 different tracks that consist of nothing but trumpet blasts of the first 10 notes of Beethoven’s Ode to Joy while they try to play a game. That’s when I decided to post on the GameMaker forums and seek out a professional music composer.

Now, do you see the problem with what I just said? I tried to put “GameMaker” and “professional” in the same sentence. Knowing what I know about GameMaker now, I’m surprised that I received anything beyond a bunch of 13-year old Zacks trying to peddle their trade as master trumpeters.

Instead, I received a very professional e-mail from a guy named Tim. He included a link to his portfolio along with a link to his company website, Northgate Productions. Immediately, I fell in love with the music samples he provided. Plus, he had a picture of himself on his website and it turns out that he looks just like me, which was enough to convince my inner narcissist that Tim would be a perfect fit for the job.

Fast forward a week, and Tim submitted the first-ever Siralim song: the battle theme. Within the first few seconds of the song, I was immediately flooded with nostalgia. The song boasted the perfect combination of Mega Man X’s hard rock elements, combined with Final Fantasy’s SNES-era prose. Actually, I have no idea what I’m talking about, but I do know the song was great.

Since then, Tim has composed music for both Siralim and Siralim 2, along with hundreds of sound effects for both games. I’m pleased to say that Tim isn’t just another Oleg, and I still work with Tim to this day. Right now, he’s working on our upcoming game, The Negative, and I think you’re going to be blown away by what he’s come up with this time. We’re trying something new with The Negative’s music that I don’t think has ever been done in a game before, and I can’t wait for you to see (and hear) how it turns out!

User Interface

Designing a user interface (that is, the menus, buttons, and other on-screen elements that communicate information about the game to the player) is hard work. It’s more of an art than a science, and each game calls for a different UI, so it’s difficult to learn from other people how to draw them “correctly”. They’re extremely tedious to implement from a programming perspective as well. Out of everything in the game, implementing Siralim’s UI was the most troublesome for me.

Imagine you’re tasked with drawing our solar system on a piece of paper. The paper is the size of your computer’s monitor, and you need to try to fit as much detail into the picture as possible: every planet, every star, every thing. If you succeed, no one will notice, which is the best case scenario. Fail, however, and your family will be murdered and your house will be burned down. That’s exactly what it’s like to design a user interface.

You see, there’s a lot of information to keep track of in an RPG, but especially so for a game like Siralim. There are hundreds of creatures to collect, and each one has a unique set of stats, traits, lore, and much more. There are also hundreds of spells and items that all need to be explained with as much detail as possible. If these explanations are unclear, players will become overwhelmed, quit the game, and leave me a bunch of negative reviews on Steam which will put me out of business, causing me to run out of money and become homeless.

But I also have a limited amount of space on your screen with which to work. I can’t write a novel about every single creature and item, because it just won’t fit. And if it does somehow fit, you’re not going to be able to read it because it’s going to need to be written in size 2 font.

This means that something has to give. I can’t possibly fit every single detail about every single aspect of the game on your screen, so I need to pick and choose what is most important and either leave the rest out or place this information in a different location in the game. Easier said than done.

When Siralim first launched on Android and iOS, I proudly handed my iPhone to my father and said, “Here it is: Siralim. People can play it on their phones now!”. With a smile, he took the phone from my hands and started to play. A few seconds later, however, I watched as his smile twisted into a frustrated frown. The muscles bunched up around his eyes, and a thick vein popped up near his left temple.

“I can’t read this. I can’t see anything at all, actually,” he said with regret. I reclaimed my phone dismissively, deeply saddened at the sudden realization that my father’s eyesight was starting to fail at his old age. Fortunately, I was able to read everything on the screen without any problems at all, and I knew everyone else would be able to as well.

Except they couldn’t. No one could. As it turns out, most people don’t have perfect vision, and not everyone has the same size of phone that I have. But hey, it’s an easy fix, right? All I need to do is increase the font size by changing a single number in the game’s code, and the problem will be resolved. That’s what the experts who left 2-star reviews on the Google Play Store told me, anyway.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t that easy. When I increased the font size, fewer words were able to fit on the screen at a time, so I had to re-word and shorten just about every piece of text in the game. Worse yet, some text didn’t fit in the UI panels at all anymore, so I had to re-size the entire UI to accommodate the new font size. In total, I spent a full week of non-stop work just to increase the game’s font size. That’s precious time that could have been better spent on other things, such as adding new content to the game or fixing bugs. On the other hand, it was only a week, so in the grand scheme of things it was for the best.

I launched an updated version of the game on all platforms that included the increased font size, eager to watch all those 2-star reviews turn into 5-star reviews as people praised the game for its endlessly-complex gameplay, brilliant soundtrack, and nostalgiac graphics.

But nope. The 2-star reviews turned into 1-star reviews instead.

“I still can’t read anything! You suck!” shouted just about everyone. At that point, I had to agree that I pretty much sucked. I wasted all that time trying to fix the problem, and somehow, I didn’t do it correctly.

I re-worked the UI again, this time increasing the font size so much that I needed to re-word everything in the game an additional time. At that point, I had to abbreviate certain words and even remove words at random from item and ability descriptions just to make it all fit. Still, I managed to get the job done and submitted yet another update for the game.

“I can finally read the text now, but the font is so ugly, wahhhhh,” read a particularly dramatic review as accurately as I can remember it. Unfortunately, the majority of players agreed that the font wasn’t very easy on the eyes, and I received an overwhelming number of requests to change the font to something different.

By now, I think you can predict how this story ends: I had to change the font not once, but twice before everyone was satisfied. In other words, I’m not very good at designing user interfaces.

Here are some other problems with the old UI that were fixed before Siralim launched on Steam:

  • You weren’t able to hold down a directional button to scroll through lists. For example, if you wanted to scroll through your list of creatures at the stable, you had to repeatedly press a key to scroll through every single creature.
  • When you received items, they didn’t appear on the screen like they do now. Instead, a simple message appeared that said something like “You received a Happy Meal”. Then, you had to open your inventory and track down the Happy Meal to see what it did.
  • Creatures didn’t have health bars in battle, so players had to read strange health ratios such as “1238 / 4883” to determine how close to death their creatures were.
  • You couldn’t force the in-game dialog to finish by pressing the confirmation button. Instead, you had to wait for the game to write it all out, which was ridiculous considering a lot of the dialog was repeated hundreds of times throughout the game (imagine breaking 10000 vases and waiting for “You received 50 Brimstone” to appear every. Single. Time.)
  • If there wasn’t enough room in the UI to fit all the text I needed to include, the game would display part of the text, wait a few seconds, and then display the rest of it in the original text’s location. For example, a creature’s trait might say “This creature deals extra damage to…”, and then after a few seconds, the game might replace that text with “…anti-vaxxers”.

Thanks for reading! In next week’s third and final post, we’ll take a look at some of Siralim’s features that were cut or radically changed before the game launched on Steam.

Update Regarding Siralim 3 on PS4 and Switch

Many of you are eager to play Siralim 3 on PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch, so I figured I’d write up a quick status update regarding where I’m at in the porting process for each of these platforms.

PlayStation 4

Originally, I announced that Siralim 3 would be released for PS4 on March 29, 2019. While that’s still the target release date, please be aware that Sony hasn’t approved my metadata submission for the game yet. The game cannot be released until the metadata is approved, so it’s possible that I’ll be forced to push the release date back a few days, or even up to a few weeks. Unfortunately, this issue is out of my hands: I’ve done everything that I’m supposed to do on my end, so it’s all in Sony’s hands now.

For those of you who are curious: “metadata” refers to information found on the PlayStation digital shop, such as the game’s description, screenshots, ESRB rating, and more.

I’ll keep you updated as I find out more information and announce a new release date if necessary. Of course, everything might just work out and we’ll be able to move forward with our original March 29 release date as expected.

Nintendo Switch

I’ve had Siralim 3 up and running on my Switch development kit for several weeks now. However, I’m currently waiting for Nintendo to approve some “paperwork” before I can even submit Siralim 3 for certification. For that reason, there is still no way for me to predict a release date for the Switch release. I’ll post an update as soon as I get more information. Thank you for your patience! The game plays extremely well on the Switch and I can’t wait for you to try it out.